Thursday, October 25, 2018

extreme juggling ...

This ongoing creative release was started quite a while ago. The Words for Wednesday prompts are provided by a number of people and has become a movable feast.Essentially the aim is to encourage you to write. Each week a selection of prompts are provided: which can be words, phrases, music or an image. You are encouraged to use any form of artistic expression (stories, poems, music, pictures) to express how those prompts move you. The prompts will be on the Elephant's Child blog this month but are provided by Margaret Adamson, and her friend Sue Fulton. 
      "Charlie, you need a haircut."
      "Hmmm.  So you speculate!"
      "Oh, so you like having hair dangling in your eyes and in your oyster dinners?"
      "Oysters?!?!  I thought I was eating mollusks!"
      "Ugh.  I'd rather chew on a horsehair crinoline than eat those!"
      "So I guess this isn't a good time to talk about the couches?"
      "What?  What about them?"
      "Perhaps it isn't a good time.  Who is your favorite basketball team for March Madness?"
      "Charlie, it's October."
      "Really?  That's odd."
      "What's odd is you asking about basketball."
      "Oh.  Well, do you have a thimble I can borrow?"
      "What do you need a thimble for?  You don't have thumbs.  You're a dog."
      "I need them to mend my knickers I wear when juggling chainsaws."
      "What?!?!? Wait a minute.  What are you talking about?"
      "Oh, I didn't tell you?  I do freelance extreme danger acts while parachuting."

      "Cindi?  Wake up.  You're talking in your sleep again."

Wednesday, October 17, 2018

lost in the fog

This ongoing creative release was started quite a while ago. The Words for Wednesday prompts are provided by a number of people and has become a movable feast.Essentially the aim is to encourage you to write. Each week a selection of prompts are provided: which can be words, phrases, music or an image. You are encouraged to use any form of artistic expression (stories, poems, music, pictures) to express how those prompts move you. The prompts will be on the Elephant's Child blog this month but are provided by Margaret Adamson, and her friend Sue Fulton. They may also include photographs taken by Margaret's friend Bill Dodds.   Today we are graced with two photos ...
photo by Margaret
He sat on the bench, facing the sun, which was so bright and blinding that he was forced to look away.

The emptiness of the bench beside him served as a harsh reminder of the emptiness he felt inside.

His world changed after she was gone.

Once they would have sat together in the sun, holding hands and laughing like school children again.

photo by Bill
His thoughts wandered aimlessly back and forth between past and present in his memories.  She had always been the one to keep his thoughts on track.  To keep him from getting lost in what he called the fog.

She called it "The Big A" as if it was a tourist attraction like New York's Big Apple.

When he was first diagnosed, he was afraid that he would forget her.  That she would become a stranger to him, tending to his needs out of a sense of duty, not out of love.

As he began to get lost in the fog more often, he became aware of how her appearance had changed.  Losing weight.  Losing hair.  When he was lucid, he would ask if she was alright, and she would tell him it was a new diet fad and not to worry.

She died one night when he was in the fog.  The cancer had eaten her up faster than The Big A had eaten him up.  When the haze lifted and he realized she was gone, a part of him was grateful. 

Now she was a part of his past, that he would never forget.  

Friday, October 12, 2018

sliced bread

This ongoing creative release was started quite a while ago. The Words for Wednesday prompts are provided by a number of people and has become a movable feast.Essentially the aim is to encourage you to write. Each week a selection of prompts are provided: which can be words, phrases, music or an image. You are encouraged to use any form of artistic expression (stories, poems, music, pictures) to express how those prompts move you. The prompts will be on the Elephant's Child blog this month but are provided by Margaret Adamson, and her friend Sue Fulton. They may also include photographs taken by Margaret's friend Bill Dodds.
This week we were given two phrases [and I'm taking an easy way out because I'm just so overwhelmed emotionally from the pictures of Hurricane Michael that I have no creative writing skills right now]:

Let the cat out of the bag. Or in this case, in the bag.


and the best thing since sliced bread.
I'm not sure why that is a "thing" but apparently, it is because there were a ton of pictures of cats in slices of bread.  Personally, I think my cats would rip my eyes out if I tried it on either of them.
And then Charlie would eat their little heads off because he loves sliced bread.

Wednesday, October 3, 2018

fighting the cassowary

This ongoing creative release was started quite a while ago. The Words for Wednesday prompts are provided by a number of people and has become a movable feast.
Essentially the aim is to encourage you to write. Each week a selection of prompts are provided: which can be words, phrases, music or an image. You are encouraged to use any form of artistic expression (stories, poems, music, pictures) to express how those prompts move you. The prompts will be on the Elephant's Child blog this month but are provided by Margaret Adamson, and her friend Sue Fulton. They may also include photographs taken by Margaret's friend Bill Dodds.
     Lainee glanced out the door of her tiny house as the sound of rain distracted her.  Light precipitation?  Hardly! she thought to herself.  The weatherman was never right.  However, given how tall and lanky he was it could have been that his view above the clouds might not have given him the best forecast for those who lived a little closer to the ground.

     She turned back to the dinner she was preparing for her family when she felt it beginning to squirm in her hands trying to escape.  It wasn't her favorite meal to prepare, but her family loved it so much that she occasionally swallowed her disgust at the grotesque little things and made them just to please them.  Escargot?  More like escar-gross.

     Just at that moment, like clockwork, she heard her heard her children come running in from school.

     "Yay!  Snail for dinner!  When will we eat?"
     "As soon as your father gets home from work, so just be still about it and go do your homework."
     "We don't have any homework today.  Teacher said that since tomorrow would be a planning day and we wouldn't have school, we didn't have to do anything until we came back next week."
     "ANOTHER planning day?!?!?  Don't they have one of those every other week?"
     "No, just one a month, but then there are quarter-planning days, half-planning days, three-quarter planning days, and holidays."

     Well, I obviously chose the wrong profession! she thought to herself.  Lainee glanced out the door at the sun and wondered what was keeping her husband.  Wrangling dinner was hard enough without ten children under her feet.
Image Source: WeHeartIt.com

     "I wonder what's keeping your father.  Did he say anything to you this morning about being late?"
     "No, only that they might be transporting some items to the winter storage today since there was a bit of frost on the grass this morning."
     "The way he and the city managers act, you'd think we were all going to become Eskimos this winter."

     The children squealed with joy over the prospect and Lainee felt a migraine starting at the back of her head and creeping up to her ears.  Rolling her eyes at the thought of being confined inside during the coming winter with ten hyperactive children, she wondered if it was too late to start praying for a cyclone to carry her away.

     "Mum?  What is a c-a-s-s-o-w-a-r-y?"

     Lainee glanced over her shoulder while scrubbing the dirt off the snail shell.  Einstein.  It figured.  When her husband had suggested the name she wondered if they weren't inviting trouble.  The child would either be in the principal's office at school for bad grades or for constantly showing up the teacher.  Fortunately, it was the latter.

     "A cassowary is a large bird.  A very large bird that lives in Australia."
     "Does it eat children?"

     This time Lainee recognized the voice.  Og.  Short for Ogelsby.  It was supposed to mean fearsome, although whoever told her husband that didn't take into account how small Og would turn out to be.  He was always afraid of large things.

     "No, dear.  But it might eat snails."  She heard the children giggling.
     "Maybe it will take your share of the snail, Og."

     Og wailed at the thought of fighting for his dinner with a gigantic bird, and Lainee turned and glared at his siblings.

     "ENOUGH!  One of you girls, pretend you are a waitress and set the table.  Make sure everyone has a bit of water to wash their dinner down."

     The children scurried around, cleaning the table and trying to look busy.  They knew that when their mother was so flustered and annoyed that she couldn't remember all their names that one of them was going to get a tail whipping before bath time.

     "Oy there!  What's for dinner?"  Immediately the children rushed to greet their father.
     "What took you so long getting home?  The children have been climbing the walls!"
     "We had to make repairs to the roof of the city auditorium to prepare for the winter storage.  What's got under your skin?"

     Lainee ignored him.  Men!